Tags: allergies, asthma, blue, briconyl, coughing, drugs, health, hospital, life, medications, threatening, wheezing

When Should I go to the Hospital?

On Health & Drugs & Medications » Allergies & Asthma

7,758 words with 15 Comments; publish: Fri, 14 Dec 2007 13:54:00 GMT; (90078.13, « »)

I have been coughing/ wheezing all day and after 3 uses of my blue briconyl I have still not stopped. I dont think it is life threatening but I can't stop. Please Help

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  • 15 Comments
    • Why don't you phone your family doctor and ask him?

      Or does your doc not do those kinds of things.

      Also, if your reliever med is bringing you no relief, that's a sign to throw in the towel.

      #1; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 16:13:00 GMT
    • Can you call your doctor? If you can, do so. If not DO go to the ER. You cannot afford to take chances.

      Elizabeth

      #2; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 16:14:00 GMT
    • Can you call your doctor? If you can, do so. If not DO go to the ER. You cannot afford to take chances.

      Elizabeth

      Thanks. I am in the process of changing docs and right now the office is closed. I may head over. Should I go if it isnt life threatening (I don't think). I have never gone to the ER for asthma before however this is the worst I have ever been.

      #3; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 16:15:00 GMT
    • Well, that depends. How good do you feel?

      Okay, now stop panicking.

      Now, really, how good do you feel?

      If you are panicking, it is imperative that you calm yourself down before you take up a bed in the ER. You might find the problem is manageable when you're calmer. Breathe deeply, and slowly. Do not hyperventilate.

      In my area, we have something called Capital Health Link -- it's a phone line staffed by registered nurses that'll answer questions you have over the phone. If you have osmething like that where you live, it might be of use to you.

      Do you have a peak flow meter? Take a peak flow. Then take your bricanyl. Does your peak flow come up any? (Give it 20 minutes after you take the bricanyl.) If it comes up, that means your medication is working. Real danger shows up when the medicine stops working.

      It's often hard to tell if it's life-threatening or not without numbers behind you, when you're panicking, that kind of thing. Try as hard as you can to think objectively. What you might just need is to go to the doctors' tomorrow.

      #4; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 16:16:00 GMT
    • Better safe than sorry. If you don't feel comfortable and you don't feel your medication is working, go to the hospital. You'll be glad you went. No point in worrying about it. You don't want things to get worse if your medicine is not helping you.
      #5; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 16:17:00 GMT
    • Better safe than sorry. If you don't feel comfortable and you don't feel your medication is working, go to the hospital. You'll be glad you went. No point in worrying about it. You don't want things to get worse if your medicine is not helping you.

      thanks guys I went and now I am MUCH better

      #6; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 16:18:00 GMT
    • thanks guys I went and now I am MUCH better

      it seems like some of the meds from the ER have worn off. My dad says that with those meds I should be fine for a week but im not sure. Also, I think I am allergic to one of the meds that i got. It looks like my face is badly sunburned (bad rash) and it is really hot. It is winter (canada) and there is no sun! What is wrong with me? Also, if i am getting a bit wheezy again what should i do?

      #7; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 16:19:00 GMT
    • I have been coughing/ wheezing all day and after 3 uses of my blue briconyl I have still not stopped. I dont think it is life threatening but I can't stop. Please Help

      I must agree with going to the ER if in doubt. As you probably know, Asthma can get worse quickly and if you meds. are not working you need to get to the ER, even if it hasn't gotten out of control. As an earlier post said, do your best to relax and if you have a peak flow meter...give it a try. If for no other reason, when you go to the ER, you will have the no. to compare to the no. they get on their peak flow. 2 weeks ago my daughter thought she was ok. She was at school and told her teachers that she just needed to be alone for a few min. to take her inhaler and to concentrate on regulating her breathing. W/i the hr. she was taken to the hospital, hyperventilating and all of her muscles froze up and she couldn't move. Please don't take chances. I hope this doesn't sound like a lecture--it's just that we have just been through this and I wouldn't wish it for anyone.

      I'll be thinking and praying for you,

      Lorie

      #8; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 16:20:00 GMT
    • Nicole,

      What medication did they give you at the hospital?

      #9; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 16:21:00 GMT
    • Nicole,

      What medication did they give you at the hospital?

      um...They gave me a mask and some predisone

      #10; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 16:22:00 GMT
    • I know of quite a few people who went to the emerg because they thought they were having an asthma attack and really they were just panicky and hyperventilating.

      That's why the peak flow meter is so great -- it's reassurance from an objective source -- if your peak flow is great, you aren't in immediate danger.

      #11; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 16:23:00 GMT
    • Hi

      I think you should go and talk to someone to get some more information on how to control your asthma and how to recognise when you need help. Do you have an asthma clinic near you? Or could you go ad see your GP? It sounds like you have a lot of worries about it which only make things worse for you. If you know what your body is doing then you will feel a lot happier.

      I only go to the A&E department if my PF's drop below a certain level and I can't get them back up at home. You need to have some kind of action plan which both you, your family and your doctor are happy with.

      I hope this helps a bit.

      Good luck

      x x

      #12; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 16:24:00 GMT
    • Hi

      I think you should go and talk to someone to get some more information on how to control your asthma and how to recognise when you need help. Do you have an asthma clinic near you? Or could you go ad see your GP? It sounds like you have a lot of worries about it which only make things worse for you. If you know what your body is doing then you will feel a lot happier.

      I only go to the A&E department if my PF's drop below a certain level and I can't get them back up at home. You need to have some kind of action plan which both you, your family and your doctor are happy with.

      I hope this helps a bit.

      Good luck

      x x

      This is my first posting on this board. I look forward to using and learning from it. I have had asthma since I was three - I'm now 50. I used an inhaler and nothing else until I was 46 - then I almost kicked the bucket. I never considered going to the Emergency Room until then because it was, JUST asthma. When I did go, they found that I had Pulmonary Emboli - blood clots in my lungs that could have traveled to my heart and left me deader than a mackerel. The Pulmonary Emboli were masked as an asthma attack, and had I not gone to the hospital I wouldn't be here today. I have had to retire early from work, and now see a miriad of specialists - Internist, Heart Doctor, Pulmonologist, and Blood Specialist. My point being I guess, is that you don't always know what is going on BESIDES an asthma attack. Better to be safe than sorry - go to the emergency room. I hope this helps. Best wishes

      #13; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 16:26:00 GMT
    • I agree, but if we all went up every time we were a little wheezy ER would be full!! I think it is important that we asthmatics learn to recognise when you need help and when you are worrying about nothing. Only you and your doctor can decide what is right for you and if in doubt it is definately better to go and get treated.

      Good luck and a happy christmas

      x x x

      #14; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 16:26:00 GMT
    • That's why a peak flow meter is so great. Gives you a good number for when you're panicking.

      As far as the dangers of OMG my asthma masked a P.E., know that PE's are rather hard to diagnose for exactly that reason -- that even an asthmatic showing up in the emergency room with symptoms of asthma doesn't necessarily make the doc want to run a D-dimer immediately.

      #15; Sat, 15 Dec 2007 16:28:00 GMT